Are the GAA disregarding the pressure faced by their University players?


“You wouldn’t do it to a greyhound” After Kerry footballer David Clifford limped off the pitch in Castlebar with a hamstring injury last week, debates have been sparked over whether or not student GAA players with county profiles are exerting themselves by trying to keep up with January’s hectic GAA calendar. Over the past week […]

How to be a better writer: the writing process – preparing and planning


  This column is here to help the students of NUI Galway with all aspects of academic writing. Writing for academic purposes is an essential student skill, yet for many, it is a daunting task. Run in conjunction with the Academic Writing Centre (AWC) at the James Hardiman Library, the column will focus on a […]

Are “free fees” a pipe dream?

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According to former NUI Galway president Dr James Browne the idea of free fees is “naïve”. He told the Irish Independent he sees a figure of €5,000 per annum as a starting point, with higher frees for science and engineering courses unless industry is willing to voluntarily subsidise the costs of those courses down to […]

Diary of a Final Year: 20 things I have learned after 4 years of University


The semicolon is a way of joining two clauses of equal importance to each other; it links ideas together. It’s not to be confused with a comma, a full stop or a colon (This was the first lesson in my Creative Writing class, and I believe it can take you places). Water is the essence […]

The last chance: Final Year reflections


The gloom-inducing thought of final year sparks a flurry of ‘last chance to-’ activities. It inspires both impromptu pints and late nights in the reading room, is both an excuse and a curse. It involves walking a thin line, savouring the last dregs of student life while also holding tight to your degree for those […]

California, here I come!


It’s been a week since I jetted off to L.A. It’s been a week, and I now know that I wasn’t as prepared for the big change as much as I thought. I spent months talking about my trip away to a place called ‘Irvine’. I took time making my amazing playlist including songs ranging […]

Ill-informed: The Great College Game


The second installment of SIN’s newest column ‘Ill-informed’, written by Jennifer O’Connor, a member of the Disability Support Services in NUI Galway.  I think that it is safe to say that so many of us have played the game Monopoly as children, and perhaps more competitively as adults. My first memory of playing the game is […]

Ill-informed: The spectrum of understanding


This is the first installment of SIN’s newest column ‘Ill-informed’, written by Jennifer O’Connor, a member of the Disability Support Services in NUI Galway. So many facets of life are described in terms of spectrums. A spectrum is thought of by many as a scale of progression describing colours, life stages and on occasion, disability, […]

Head to head: Against capping – an argument on behalf of human error

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Capping is but the latest in a series of crackdowns on the freedom of students here at NUI Galway. In the last two years, the capping of repeat examinations at 40% has been gradually phased in and received by the student body in general with all the warmth of a limp handshake. Capping, in theory, […]

Head to head: an argument in favour of capping repeat exams at 40%

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So since last year, if you have to repeat an exam in NUI Galway in the summer, the best result you can get is a bare pass, 40%. And this is only fair. The repeat exams are a safety net to stop people having to repeat a year, or fail a course. But they were […]